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Pregnant womans energy needs must be met in order to

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Back in high school, I once had to burn a Cheeto in a science lab. Since then, I think I've had a pretty good grasp of what a calorie is which is good, since that was the purpose of the lab Leer comentario completo. I usually avoid reading about food because it usually makes me want to smear some Wonder Bread with the most hydrogenated peanut butter I can find, roll it all up into a ball, and shove it in my mouth

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Nutrition during Pregnancy and Lactation Flashcards Preview

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Background: Energy requirements during pregnancy remain controversial because of uncertainties regarding maternal fat deposition and reductions in physical activity. Objective: This study was designed to estimate the energy requirements of healthy underweight, normal-weight, and overweight pregnant women and to explore energetic adaptations to pregnancy.

Energy deposition was calculated from changes in body protein and fat. Energy requirements equaled the sum of TEE and energy deposition. Energy costs of pregnancy depended on BMI group. Although total protein deposition did not differ significantly by BMI group mean for the 3 groups: g protein , FM deposition did 5.

Conclusion: Extra energy intake is required by healthy pregnant women to support adequate gestational weight gain and increases in BMR, which are not totally offset by reductions in AEE. Extra dietary energy is required during pregnancy to make up for the energy deposited in maternal and fetal tissues and the rise in energy expenditure attributable to increased basal metabolism and to changes in the energy cost of physical activity.

Weight gain during pregnancy results from products of conception fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid , increases in various maternal tissues uterus, breasts, blood, and extracellular extravascular fluid , and increases in maternal fat stores.

Hytten and Chamberlain 1 developed a theoretical model to estimate energy requirements during pregnancy, assuming an average gestational weight gain GWG of This model was the basis of current recommendations for energy intakes in pregnant women 2 , 3. Energy requirements during pregnancy remain controversial because of conflicting data on maternal fat deposition and putative reductions in the mother's physical activity as pregnancy advances 4.

Integral to the energy requirements of pregnancy is the determination of desirable GWG and the inevitable deposition of maternal fat. The recommended ranges were derived from the observed weight gains of women delivering full-term, healthy infants without complications. A systematic review showed that GWG within the recommended ranges was associated with the best outcome for both infants, in terms of birth weight, and for mothers, in terms of delivery complications and postpartum weight retention 6.

Because GWG influences energy requirements, maternal BMI should be taken into account when making energy intake recommendations for pregnant women. Traditionally, the energy requirements of pregnant women have been derived factorially from the increment in BMR and energy deposited in tissues. This factorial approach ignores potential changes in physical activity and the thermic effect of feeding. Energetic adaptations to pregnancy may be a function of maternal BMI 4.

The purpose of this study was to define the energy requirements of healthy pregnant women with low, normal, or high BMIs. The specific objectives were to 1 estimate energy deposition from changes in body protein and fat; 2 measure changes in BMR, h energy expenditure h EE , AEE, and TEE throughout pregnancy and postpartum; 3 determine the effect of BMI status, weight, and body-composition changes on BMR, h EE, and TEE; 4 determine the association between physical activity and weight and body-composition changes during pregnancy and postpartum; and 5 define the energy requirements of healthy pregnant women on the basis of the sum of TEE and energy deposition.

In the high-BMI group, 8 women were classified as overweight and 4 were classified as obese according to the IOM categories 5. At enrollment, the women were nonanemic, normoglycemic, and euthyroidic. A total of healthy women were enrolled in the study at baseline. Gestational age was taken as reported in the hospital record or as determined with the Dubowitz test, from the last menstrual period, or from ultrasound.

Twelve women were dropped from the study for the following reasons: 3 delivered sets of twins, 1 delivered a set of triplets, 5 delivered preterm infants, 2 had miscarriages, and 1 developed preeclampsia. In addition, one woman moved away from the Houston area. During this period, women recorded their weight weekly. Because dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry DXA and total body nitrogen TBN measurements involve some radiation exposure, these measurements were made only before and after pregnancy.

This study was approved by the Baylor Affiliates Review Board for Human Subject Research, recruitment was done through local newspapers and community fliers, and informed written consent was obtained from each woman.

Total body potassium TBK was estimated from the 40 K naturally present in the body with the use of the Children's Nutrition Research Center whole-body counter 8. The detectors were inside a shielded room to reduce background interference. At 0, 22, and 36 wk of pregnancy and at 27 wk postpartum, TBW was estimated by extrapolation to zero-time intercept from samples collected daily for 13 d as part of the DLW method.

At 9 wk of pregnancy and at 2 and 6 wk postpartum, TBW was estimated with the plateau method from samples collected 4—6 h postdose. Deuterium dilution space was converted to TBW by dividing by 1.

Body volume was corrected for residual lung volume, which was measured separately by the simplified nitrogen washout method Energy deposition or mobilization was computed from the changes in protein and FM between adjacent study intervals. The energy equivalents for protein and fat deposition or mobilization were taken as 5. The performance of the respiration calorimeters was described in detail previously The average temperature and humidity within the calorimeter were All urine was collected during the h calorimetry procedure.

Urine samples were acidified with 6N HCl and refrigerated. Urinary volume was measured and nitrogen concentrations were determined by Kjeldahl digestion Kjeltec Auto Analyzer ; Tecator, Hoganas, Sweden , which were followed by a phenol-hypochlorite colorimetric reaction All milk produced during the 24 h in the calorimeter was expressed with an electric breast pump.

Subjects adhered to a set schedule while in the calorimeter. Calorimetry began at Meals were served at , , and , with a snack at No food was allowed after ; bedtime was at After fasting overnight for 12 h, the subjects were awakened at , were asked to void, and returned to sleep. After it was confirmed that they were awake, BMR was measured for 40 min. BMR was calculated by using the Weir equation After a baseline saliva sample was collected, the women received by mouth mg 2 H 2 O and mg H 2 18 O both from Cambridge Isotope Laboratories per kg body weight.

The time of collection was recorded. Saliva samples were analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratio measurements by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry 9. Post hoc pairwise comparisons between BMI groups or time intervals were performed by using Tukey's method.

There were no statistically significant differences in age, ethnicity, family income, attained level of education, gravidity, or parity in the low-, normal- and high-BMI groups.

Maternal weight and body-composition measures are summarized in Table 2. Mean gestational duration was Mean GWGs, computed as the difference in weight at delivery minus baseline, were Details on changes in body weight and composition and their influence on pregnancy outcome are published elsewhere At 2, 6, and 27 wk postpartum, 55, 53, and 39 of the 63 women were breastfeeding, respectively.

Maternal weight and body composition throughout a reproductive cycle 1. Energy deposition estimated from changes in body protein and FM during the first, second, and third trimesters is summarized in Table 3. Total protein deposition did not differ significantly between BMI groups g protein and was highest in the third trimester. Postpartum changes in total body protein were greater earlier 2—6 wk than later 6—27 wk.

Postpartum FM and energy deposition or mobilization did not differ significantly between BMI groups or time intervals. Energy deposition or mobilization on the basis of changes in body protein and fat during pregnancy and the postpartum period 1. The absolute and relative changes in BMR from baseline are presented in Table 5. Total energy expenditure measured by h respiratory calorimetry and the doubly labeled water method during pregnancy and the postpartum period and estimated total energy costs 1.

Energy costs include changes in energy stores but do not include the energy cost of lactation. The absolute and relative changes in h EE from baseline are provided in Table 5. TEE increased throughout pregnancy at a mean rate of 5. In the low- and high-BMI groups, mean TEE decreased in the second trimester and then increased in the third trimester; the overall increases were 2. Gestational changes in TEE did not correlate with the changes in weight or body composition.

Rates of change in BMR PAL at 22 and 36 wk of pregnancy was negatively correlated with birth weight. Total energy costs derived from the sum of TEE and energy deposition or mobilization are summarized for the low-, normal-, and high-BMI groups in Table 4. Postpartum, an additional allowance is required to cover the costs of lactation.

This study determined the extra dietary energy needs during pregnancy from the sum of TEE and energy deposition and resolved uncertainties regarding maternal fat deposition and putative reductions in physical activity.

However, recommendations for energy intake in pregnant women must be population-specific because of differences in body size and lifestyles. The extent to which women change their habitual activity patterns during pregnancy will be determined by socioeconomic and cultural factors specific to the population. The subjects in the current study were representative of healthy moderately active American women with low, normal, or high prepregnancy BMIs. As is characteristic of pregnant women 4 , 25 , high variability was seen in their rates of GWG, energy deposition, and energy expenditure, and thus, in their energy costs during pregnancy.

In our study, the energy deposited in maternal and fetal tissues as fat was estimated from a multicomponent body-composition model based on TBW, body volume, and BMC, and as protein from TBK measurements. Total fat accretion, the major contributor to energy deposition, averaged 3.

Mean fat gains in this study were 5. As described in our companion article about body composition 24 , excessive GWG was attributed primarily to FM gain, not protein accretion, and is undesirable. Maternal fat retention at 27 wk postpartum was significantly higher in women who gained above IOM recommendations for GWG than in those who gained within or below recommendations.

As a result of increased tissue mass, the energy cost for maintenance rises during pregnancy. The increase in BMR is one of the major components of the energy cost of pregnancy. Several longitudinal studies have been published that measured changes in BMR throughout pregnancy 27 — 30 , 36 — However, striking variability in metabolic response was seen between the women in our study; BMR and sleeping metabolic rate decreased relative to pregravid values during the first and second trimesters in some women and increased steadily throughout pregnancy in the others.

This relation was also seen within populations in the United Kingdom 28 , 39 and The Gambia Whole-room h respiration calorimetry was performed in well-nourished pregnant women in only a few studies 29 , 39 , Because of individual differences in physical activity, AEE is highly variable. Activity records confirmed a decrease across all categories, ranging in intensity from occupational and home activities to sports.

Although activity records provide insight into types of activities, they do not provide quantitative estimates of energy expenditure. In the pregnant women in the current study, the energy conserved by the decrease in AEE did not totally compensate for the rise in BMR and energy deposited in maternal and fetal tissues.

Interestingly, birth weight was inversely associated with PAL at 22 and 36 wk of pregnancy.

11 Nutrition and physical activity

Authors Eleanor Schlenker and Joyce Gilbert address nutrition across the lifespan and within the community, with an emphasis on health promotion and the effects of culture and religion on nutrition. Evidence-based information, real-world case scenarios, colorful illustrations, boxes, and tables help you learn how to apply essential nutrition concepts and therapies in clinical practice. Eleanor Schlenker , Joyce Ann Gilbert. Key terms identified in the text and defined on the page help reinforce critical concepts. Case studies illustrate key concepts in authentic, "real-life" scenarios that reinforce learning and promote nutritional applications.

An Introduction to Tropical Food Science. Hans Gerd Muller. This introduction to tropical food science addresses the needs of two groups of people.

We need essential amino acids, carbohydrate, essential fatty acids, and 28 vitamins and minerals to sustain life and health. However, nutritional needs vary from one life stage to another. During intrauterine development, infancy, and childhood, for example, recommended intakes of macronutrients and most micronutrients are higher relative to body size, compared with those during adulthood. In elderly persons, some nutrient needs e.

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Background: Energy requirements during pregnancy remain controversial because of uncertainties regarding maternal fat deposition and reductions in physical activity. Objective: This study was designed to estimate the energy requirements of healthy underweight, normal-weight, and overweight pregnant women and to explore energetic adaptations to pregnancy. Energy deposition was calculated from changes in body protein and fat. Energy requirements equaled the sum of TEE and energy deposition. Energy costs of pregnancy depended on BMI group.

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Consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods during pregnancy is important to ensure that the nutritional requirements of both mother and baby are met. In some situations, supplementation of some vitamins or minerals may be advisable. Regular low to moderate-intensity physical activity is generally safe during pregnancy with likely benefits for mother and baby. The nutritional status of a woman before and during pregnancy plays a vital role in fetal growth and development.

The statistics are alarmingthe incidence of diabetes in the general population and pregnancy in particular is on the rise. As a result, the need for effective treatments to control the blood glucose level in pregnant diabetic women is likely to grow. He relies on his professional experience to provide a practical guide for healthcare practitioners and insulin pump users that illustrates a protocol for insulin pump therapy during pregnancy. With the goal of achieving good blood glucose control to ensure an excellent short- and long-term outcome for both baby and expectant mother, Dr.

Account Options Sign in. Conseguir libro impreso. Marie Dunford. Physiology of anaerobic and aerobic exercise -- Carbohydrate and exercise -- Protein and exercise -- Dietary fat and exercise -- Vitamins, minerals, and exercise -- Fluid, electrolytes and exercise -- Dietary supplements and ergogenic aids -- Health screening and dietary assessment -- Physical fitness assessment and prescription -- Assessment of body size and composition -- Energy balance and weight management -- Child and adolescent athletes -- College athletes -- Masters athletes -- Working with elite athletes -- Vegetarian athletes -- Pregnancy and exercise -- Disordered eating in athletes -- Management of diabetes and exercise -- Cardiovascular disease prevention and management -- Nutrition for very high intensity sports -- Nutrition for high intensity, short duration sports -- Nutrition for intermittent, high intensity sports -- Nutrition for endurance sports -- Nutrition for weight restricted and body focused sports -- Nutrition for low endurance, precision sports. Contenido XXXV. Derechos de autor.

Authors Eleanor Schlenker and Sara Long address nutrition across the life span and within the community, with an emphasis on health promotion and the effects of culture and religion on nutrition. The revised edition has been updated with current government dietary guidelines, including the new MyPlate recommendations. Other key topics include childhood obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and food safety. Plus, evidence-based information and real-world case scenarios help you learn how to apply essential nutrition concepts and therapies in clinical practice. Eleanor Schlenker , Sara Long Roth. Case studies illustrate key concepts in authentic, "real-life" scenarios that reinforce learning and promote nutritional applications. Cultural Content boxes highlight the critical, yet often overlooked, role culture plays in nutrition — a role that is becoming more important as the population becomes more diverse.

on the order of MJ day21, resulting in a net increment of MJ day21 over non- pregnant 'The energy requirement of a pregnant woman is the level of energy intake from food Women ideally should enter pregnancy with a body size and composition it must be concluded that the energy cost of lactation is dedeenergyfund.com NF Butte - ‎Cited by - ‎Related articles.

Dietary intake during pregnancy must provide the energy that will ensure the full-term delivery of a healthy newborn baby of adequate size and appropriate body composition by a woman whose weight, body composition and PAL are consistent with long-term good health and well-being. The ideal situation is for a woman to enter pregnancy at a normal weight and with good nutritional status. Therefore, the energy requirements of pregnancy are those needed for adequate maternal gain to ensure the growth of the foetus, placenta and associated maternal tissues, and to provide for the increased metabolic demands of pregnancy, in addition to the energy needed to maintain adequate maternal weight, body composition and physical activity throughout the gestational period, as well as for sufficient energy stores to assist in proper lactation after delivery. Special considerations must be made for women who are under- or overweight when they enter pregnancy. This consultation reviewed recent information on the association of maternal weight gain and body composition with the newborn birth weight, on the influence of birth weight on infant mortality, and on the associated metabolic demands of pregnancy WHO, a; Kelly et al.

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